Point, Line, Plane - Physical Expression
Point, Line, Plane - Physical Expression

The inspiration for this piece was fire. Before anything else, I decided my medium was going to be matches. To pack the matches together I made a frame using duct tape as a sticky base to hold the matches upright. I chose the word passion because it fuels the spark of inner desire, the fire of the heart. As Ferdinand Foch said once, “The most powerful weapon on earth is the human soul on fire.”

My Life. My Future.
My Life. My Future.

The inspiration for this piece was a subway map. I’ve always loved maps and puzzles and complex visualizations of information. All of “subway lines” represent large portions of my life and important people and hobbies. The font is orderly yet lively, a reflection of my personality. I had a lot of fun learning to love the pen tool in Adobe Illustrator where I drew all the lines by hand.

Scale - Larger Than Life
Scale - Larger Than Life

The thought behind the use of paper clips was that it resembled chain links in a ship anchor. Where a paper clip is diminutive in size, an anchor and its chain help hold down massive ships while they’re docked. I wanted to communicate strength and sturdiness in a paper clip by having it ironically hold down a boat made out of paper sailing in a fishbowl.

Personal Avatar
Personal Avatar

I approached this exercise with a strong desire to imitate the beauty of geometric form expressed in low poly artwork, the hallmark of early game development. As an engineer, I think I’m also drawn to the beauty and power of the most basic of shapes, the triangle, because it can be found everwhere in our environment. I started with triangles by hand before moving to the pen tool.

Design Activist Manifesto
Design Activist Manifesto

Designers seem especially drawn to manifestos. A well-written manifesto is like a well-designed product. It communicates directly, it is broken into functional parts, and it has elements of poetry and surprise. And drafting one is more like writing an ad than writing a novel. Manifestos typically have a social function— they serve to bring together members of a group. This work is my design manifesto; these are my opinions and reflections on design.

Form and Volume - Designing a Door Handle
Form and Volume - Designing a Door Handle

I approached this exercise with a strong desire to learn how to use T-splines and create a smooth form in Fusion. Push-bar door handles are everywhere in commercial buildings and offer the convenience of opening the door without having to use your hands. However, they do not fit the aesthetic of the home. I have designed a lever-based dual-action push and pull handle that would fit elegantly on your doors at home.

Connections and Joinery - Modular Wood Assembly
Connections and Joinery - Modular Wood Assembly

I was inspired by a cross stub tenon joint. The cross piqued my interest due to its symmetrical shape, allowing for multiple modes of connection. My original plan was to do a single unit height cross, but that would have been too flimsy and would not have lent any depth (z-height) to the assembly. By making the cross portion 2 units tall, I created a way for the modular pieces to assemble into a grid weave through an extension of the mortise and tenon joint.

Lamp Design - PH Artichoke, Poul Henningsen, 1958
Lamp Design - PH Artichoke, Poul Henningsen, 1958

Poul Henningsen was asked to design a lamp for the Langelinie Pavilion, a restaurant in Copenhagen in 1958. It’s inspiration, of which the lamp’s Danish name ‘Kogle’ is a literal translation of, is the geometric beauty of a conifer cone. Henningsen said, “When you look into people’s homes in the evenings, you shudder at how dismal they look. Everything in the home is unimportant compared with the positioning of the lighting. It doesn’t cost money to light a room correctly, but it does require culture.” Its 72 leaves are placed so that you cannot see the bulb, thus casting a soft, radiant light in all directions. The Artichoke is offered in steel, white, copper, and glass, with it’s sturdy construction only contributing to the timeless beauty of the lamp. 

All the materials in my version are alternatives to the 100% metal and glass build of the original. I started by prototyping the upper dish of the lamp because it’s stiffness was vital to the structural stability of the rest of the lamp. I tried taskboard, chipboard, and landed with using multiple layers of silver posterboard because the former materials were not easily painted to achieve a smooth metallic finish. I also tried the leaves in chipboard because it could be wetted and molded to a shape, but ran into the same unsatisfactory paint jobs. Thin white acrylic offered a similar likeness to the glass version of the lamp, which made it into the final version.

Lamp Design Poster - PH Artichoke, Poul Henningsen, 1958
Lamp Design Poster - PH Artichoke, Poul Henningsen, 1958

This poster is the 2D manifest of a 3D physical form. I chose the polar grid as a background to give weight to the geometric form of the PH Artichoke, but also to echo the obsessive nature Henningsen had with how light emanated from his lamp designs. The manufacturer of the Artichoke still displays light measurements of its lamps on spec sheets, which are plotted on polar diagrams. The gradient gives the lamp radiance, reflecting on how the lamp lights its environment in reality.

Point, Line, Plane - Physical Expression
My Life. My Future.
Scale - Larger Than Life
Personal Avatar
Design Activist Manifesto
Form and Volume - Designing a Door Handle
Connections and Joinery - Modular Wood Assembly
Lamp Design - PH Artichoke, Poul Henningsen, 1958
Lamp Design Poster - PH Artichoke, Poul Henningsen, 1958
Point, Line, Plane - Physical Expression

The inspiration for this piece was fire. Before anything else, I decided my medium was going to be matches. To pack the matches together I made a frame using duct tape as a sticky base to hold the matches upright. I chose the word passion because it fuels the spark of inner desire, the fire of the heart. As Ferdinand Foch said once, “The most powerful weapon on earth is the human soul on fire.”

My Life. My Future.

The inspiration for this piece was a subway map. I’ve always loved maps and puzzles and complex visualizations of information. All of “subway lines” represent large portions of my life and important people and hobbies. The font is orderly yet lively, a reflection of my personality. I had a lot of fun learning to love the pen tool in Adobe Illustrator where I drew all the lines by hand.

Scale - Larger Than Life

The thought behind the use of paper clips was that it resembled chain links in a ship anchor. Where a paper clip is diminutive in size, an anchor and its chain help hold down massive ships while they’re docked. I wanted to communicate strength and sturdiness in a paper clip by having it ironically hold down a boat made out of paper sailing in a fishbowl.

Personal Avatar

I approached this exercise with a strong desire to imitate the beauty of geometric form expressed in low poly artwork, the hallmark of early game development. As an engineer, I think I’m also drawn to the beauty and power of the most basic of shapes, the triangle, because it can be found everwhere in our environment. I started with triangles by hand before moving to the pen tool.

Design Activist Manifesto

Designers seem especially drawn to manifestos. A well-written manifesto is like a well-designed product. It communicates directly, it is broken into functional parts, and it has elements of poetry and surprise. And drafting one is more like writing an ad than writing a novel. Manifestos typically have a social function— they serve to bring together members of a group. This work is my design manifesto; these are my opinions and reflections on design.

Form and Volume - Designing a Door Handle

I approached this exercise with a strong desire to learn how to use T-splines and create a smooth form in Fusion. Push-bar door handles are everywhere in commercial buildings and offer the convenience of opening the door without having to use your hands. However, they do not fit the aesthetic of the home. I have designed a lever-based dual-action push and pull handle that would fit elegantly on your doors at home.

Connections and Joinery - Modular Wood Assembly

I was inspired by a cross stub tenon joint. The cross piqued my interest due to its symmetrical shape, allowing for multiple modes of connection. My original plan was to do a single unit height cross, but that would have been too flimsy and would not have lent any depth (z-height) to the assembly. By making the cross portion 2 units tall, I created a way for the modular pieces to assemble into a grid weave through an extension of the mortise and tenon joint.

Lamp Design - PH Artichoke, Poul Henningsen, 1958

Poul Henningsen was asked to design a lamp for the Langelinie Pavilion, a restaurant in Copenhagen in 1958. It’s inspiration, of which the lamp’s Danish name ‘Kogle’ is a literal translation of, is the geometric beauty of a conifer cone. Henningsen said, “When you look into people’s homes in the evenings, you shudder at how dismal they look. Everything in the home is unimportant compared with the positioning of the lighting. It doesn’t cost money to light a room correctly, but it does require culture.” Its 72 leaves are placed so that you cannot see the bulb, thus casting a soft, radiant light in all directions. The Artichoke is offered in steel, white, copper, and glass, with it’s sturdy construction only contributing to the timeless beauty of the lamp. 

All the materials in my version are alternatives to the 100% metal and glass build of the original. I started by prototyping the upper dish of the lamp because it’s stiffness was vital to the structural stability of the rest of the lamp. I tried taskboard, chipboard, and landed with using multiple layers of silver posterboard because the former materials were not easily painted to achieve a smooth metallic finish. I also tried the leaves in chipboard because it could be wetted and molded to a shape, but ran into the same unsatisfactory paint jobs. Thin white acrylic offered a similar likeness to the glass version of the lamp, which made it into the final version.

Lamp Design Poster - PH Artichoke, Poul Henningsen, 1958

This poster is the 2D manifest of a 3D physical form. I chose the polar grid as a background to give weight to the geometric form of the PH Artichoke, but also to echo the obsessive nature Henningsen had with how light emanated from his lamp designs. The manufacturer of the Artichoke still displays light measurements of its lamps on spec sheets, which are plotted on polar diagrams. The gradient gives the lamp radiance, reflecting on how the lamp lights its environment in reality.

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